Tonto National Monument

  • People hiking at Tonto National Monument



Tonto Information

The Salado Phenomena blended ideas of Native American cultures that resulted in a new vibrant society. Tonto National Monument showcases Salado-style culture.

Well-preserved cliff dwellings were occupied by the Salado culture during the 13th, 14th, and early 15th centuries. The people farmed in the Salt River Valley and supplemented their diet by hunting and gathering native wildlife and plants. The Salado were fine craftsmen, producing some of the most exquisite polychrome pottery and intricately woven textiles to be found in the Southwest.

The monument is located in the Upper Sonoran ecosystem, known primarily for its characteristic saguaro cactus. Other common plants include: cholla, prickly pear, hedgehog, and barrel cactus (blooming April through June); yucca, sotol, and agave; creosote bush and ocotillo; palo verde and mesquite trees; an amazing variety of colorful wild flowers (February through March); and a lush riparian area which supports large Arizona black walnut, sycamore, and hackberry trees.


Making an Impact

Visiting Tonto

Map of the Park

Tonto National Monument
HC02, Box 4602
Roosevelt , AZ

Parks Near Tonto National Monument

Casa Grande Ruins National Monument
Casa Grande Ruins, the nation's first archeological preserve, protects the Casa Grande and other archeological sites within its boundaries.
Hohokam park
Hohokam Pima National Monument protected 2,000 inhabitants in 'Snaketown,' village. When Hokoham Pimas was excavated, the site became invisible above ground.
Tuzigoot National Monument
Tuzigoot National Monument in the Verde Valley, is an ancient village, or pueblo, built by the Sinagua people, who were farmers and artists.
Image of Montezuma Castle National Monument
Last used by prehistoric Sinagua Indians over 600 years ago, Montezuma Castle has been called one of the best preserved cliff dwellings in North America.
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