From the Reef to the Peaks

Guadalupe Mountains National Park

Anchors

Guadalupe Peak is the highest point in Texas, and below it lies a park that offers striking natural beauty, winding trails through serene forests, captivating local history, and the world’s most extensive Permian fossil reef.
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Guadalupe Mountains Information

Explore deserts and dunes, canyons and mountains, diverse flora and fauna, and much more at Guadalupe Mountains National Park. Campers, hikers, and thrill-seekers welcome.

Explore deserts and dunes, canyons and mountains, diverse flora and fauna, and much more at Guadalupe Mountains National Park. Campers, hikers, and thrill-seekers welcome.

“Great things are done when men and mountains meet.”
—William Blake

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Park Information

These mountains have seen quite a bit of activity over the last 10,000 years. Early hunter-gathering people lived in the area’s many caves, and later the Mescalero Apaches discovered game hunting opportunities on the land. Artifacts that reflect their time here—such as agave roasting pits—can still be located throughout the region. At the nearby Frijole Ranch you’ll find a small museum that tells the story of comings and goings, conflicts and conquests, and everything that led up to the making of a national park on this incredible mountain range. 

Guadalupe Mountains National Park is a must-visit destination for hikers, with more than 80 miles of trails winding from woodland canyons to lush springs. Experienced trekkers can access the more rugged parts of the park via steep switchbacks that zigzag up the mountains, where once-in-a-lifetime photo-ops await.

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