You Can Help!

November 22, 2016NPF Blog
A person walking on a bridge over a river amongst the green and yellow trees in a valley at Grand Teton National Park
6 Ways to Give to National Parks that Actually Make a Difference

Could there be a more uniquely American idea than our national parks? For the last hundred years, the National Park Service has worked tirelessly to preserve the magnificent places that inspire, mystify, and humble us. And through the National Park Service's official nonprofit partner, the National Park Foundation, we all have an opportunity to show our appreciation. 

The National Park Foundation is the official charity of America's national parks, helping to preserve these precious spaces and pass them on to future generations. When you make a national park donation, your support helps protect these gems, connect all people to our national treasures, and inspires the next generation of national park champions. There are countless ways to enjoy our national parks, and almost as many to give back.

Thee people hiking on a roped team in the mountains of Denali National Park & Preserve
Amy Wise, Share the Experience
  • Donate: Your donations to the National Park Foundation help sustain and conserve our over 400 national parks, which collectively preserve more than 84 million acres of America's most cherished landscapes, ecosystems, and historical sites. Donations in any amount, from one-time gifts to recurring monthly contributions, are among the most helpful ways that you can support our national parks.
  • Renew: If you've given to the National Park Foundation before, it's easy to make your donation a yearly tradition through a renewal
  • Join: The National Park Foundation is made up of passionate national park enthusiasts who share a common love for our national parks — and you can be one of them! Join the national park community today! 
  • Give a gift: Be sure to check out the National Park Foundation's national parks gift guide, where you can always find a gift for someone special — or just for yourself. Whether you purchase clothes, coffee mugs, games, or tote bags, the proceeds will benefit our national parks. 
  • Donate in honor or memory: Donate to national parks in the name of a friend or loved one to celebrate the memory of someone special or mark an occasion such as a birthday or anniversary. 
  • Make the parks your legacy: Whether you are interested in a simple gift through your retirement or life insurance plan, a traditional bequest through your will or trust, or perhaps a gift that pays you back like a charitable gift annuity—there are many ways to make a legacy gift. Explore how you can include the National Park Foundation in your estate plans.

Three people standing at the edge of a cliff at Grand Canyon National Park
Peter Blanchard, Share the Experience

The National Park Foundation is able to provide grants and support programs across the country thanks to the generous contributions of members and supporters. Donating to national parks is a great way to give back, so why not learn more about the National Park Foundation, the only national charitable organization of its kind directly supporting America’s national parks?

Comments

Will donations to the National Parks Foundation be used solely to upkeep the parks, and otherwise preserve the nature within, and not be used to spread misinformation about science nor to facilitate the despoilage of the parks through drilling, logging, mining, or other intrusion on the land or its resources as has been proposed by the Trump administration?
MM
Glaser
I would love to appreciate our national parks and state parks more. But I travel with my dog. And you hate dogs.
Leslie
Nixon
Not all, but many of the parks of the national park system are dog-friendly, or have dog friendly areas. There's a blog post that names just a few of these parks: explore-parks/travel-ideas/dont-leave-fido-home-explore-these-7-dog-friendly-national-parks
Edith
Han
I have brought my dog to Acadia, N.P. many times. Camp at Blackwoods and you see them there too.
L
Lambi
The parks are mainly there for preservation of land and wildlife. Dogs are domestic animals and disturb the habitat as they are not natural prey or predator. Parks exclude dogs not out of hate but to preserve the dogs and the wildlife. .
jo
christie
We have traveled to Acadia NP and Grand Canyon NP with our dog. We actually stayed at a lodge inside the park this year. Haven't met anyone that hated dogs so far. But I do check ahead.
Judy
Plourde
I wish MORE parks didn't allow dogs. You see much more wildlife when there are no dogs on the trail. And it's just much more pleasant not to encounter dogs or have to hear them barking. Plus so many dog owners let their dogs run unleashed, which makes it unpleasant for everyone, except the selfish dog owner.
Kim
Antieau
To be totally honest, I also used to be upset that dogs were not allowed in national parks too. I understand wanting to have your dog with you, but I also understand that they are doing this for the safety and protection of our dogs. Yellowstone, for example, is not a safe place for dogs to be at all. It's for the safety our our dogs we love as well as the other wildlife in the park that they have this policy.
Megan
Hopkins
Volunteering your time to the National Park system, trail maintenance, trail ambassidor, providing information at the visitor centers etc. there are many ways to provide benefit to the parks in addition to $$.
Kevin
Berry
As a proud volunteer, I am surprised that you didn't mention the most direct and useful gift of all - time. The network of dedicated volunteers is the glue that holds the loose ends of the NPS together. I do interpretation and absolutely love doing it. Please consider volunteering, if only for a few hours each month. It is highly rewarding, especially for retirees like me!
Kerry
Perkins
Where would I find information on short term volunteer projects? Thanks! Kevin B
Kevin
bartel
Want to volunteer? I highly recommend it. Go here for information: https://www.nps.gov/getinvolved/volunteer.htm
Lee
Graves
You can find volunteer opportunities through www.volunteer.gov. You can find and apply for volunteer positions in national parks, as well as any other branch of the US federal government.
Jodi
B
I too was quite surprised not to see volunteer work mentioned. Every hour we volunteer is an hour of service not required to be paid to regular employees, allowing for investment elsewhere in the park or Park Service.
Karen
Adams
Agree with the comments of volunteering. Note that volunteer time requirements are minimal. Here in the National Capital Park its a minimum of only 8 hours a month.
Wayne
Gifford
I prefer to enjoy and appreciate our national parks without the presence of pets.
Kristin
Harms
What can we do to stop corporate development (mining, drilling, grazing, etc) on or near National Park lands???
Linda
Flanigan
I stopped at it national parks during a cross country trip several years ago. Actually, I had no true itinerary. Instead, I picked a park, drove there, stayed the night in that area and moved on the next day What a fabulous experience.
Kathleen
Repass
Why no mention of volunteering? I can't think of a better way to help out than to help out. -a proud volunteer in parks
Kerry
Perkins

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