Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park

Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park, established in 1916, displays the results of 70 million years of volcanism, migration, and evolution -- processes that thrust a bare land from the sea and clothed it with complex and unique ecosystems and a distinct human culture. The park encompasses diverse environments that range from sea level to the summit of the earth's most massive volcano, Mauna Loa, at 13,677 feet. Also inside the park is Kilauea, the world's most active volcano, which offers scientists insights on the birth of the Hawaiian Islands and visitors views of dramatic volcanic landscapes.

Over half of the park is designated wilderness and provides unusual hiking and camping opportunities. In recognition of its outstanding natural values, Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park was designated as an International Biosphere Reserve in 1980 and a World Heritage Site in 1987.

NPF'S Impact at Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park

  • The National Park Foundation’s Impact grant at Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park is protecting endangered hawkbill turtles. By increasing the resiliency of the Hawaiian island park population turtles the park...

Photos from Flickr

    Photos from Park Visitors

    Shared Videos