November is a great month to share in our thankfulness for parks. We're sharing a dollar-for-dollar donation match this month. If you want to share your love of parks with friends and family, check out our Holiday Gift Guide

National Park Foundation, GoParks newsletter graphic cover image of yellow, autumn-turned trees lining the Concord Riverbed, the North Bridge arches across the horizon, with the silhouette of two people standing at the center

Giving Thanks for Parks on #GivingTuesday

The iconic mountain peak, Half Dome, of Yosemite National Park can be seen standing tall behind a large cluster of trees, turning yellow for autumn, a still, reflective body of water fills the foreground

This has been a challenging year, and we are humbled by the outpouring of support from friends like you. Our national parks are the embodiment of our natural legacy, our shared culture, and our collective history. We still have so much more work to do for our parks as we move towards the next year. And there's no better time than now to make a year-end gift, thanks to our Board of Directors. All gifts will be matched, dollar-for-dollar, up to a total of $500,000 through December 31. You don’t have to wait for #GivingTuesday, make your donation today and it will be doubled!


P.S. Increase your impact and encourage your network to donate today by hosting a Facebook Fundraiser for NPF!

Monitoring the Golden Eagle in Yellowstone

An eagle flies directly overhead, in a clear blue sky, with its wings outstretched

In 2011, scientists discovered a sizeable population of golden eagles in Yellowstone National Park, a sign that the park could serve as refuge for a population threatened in the western United States. With help from funding from National Park Foundation and other partners, Yellowstone National Park conducted a 10-year study of the park's golden eagle population. The study’s findings will be used to develop a plan to protect the species and ensure their survival. Learn more about how NPF is helping protect species like the golden eagle who make their home in our national parks.

Our 2020 Holiday Gift Guide

A very snowy path in Yellowstone National Park, where the trees are spiky with icicles and the walkway is distinguishable only by the wood railing

2020 is almost over, folks. When we look back on the year, we’re reminded of how helpful national parks are for our health and wellbeing. Parks have provided us a respite from stress, a reflection of our history and culture, and a place to create memories with family and friends. At NPF, we are proud to support some of the world's most scenic, historic, and cultural places. This holiday season give a gift that will bring the parks to your loved one, and help NPF protect parks for generations to come.

Get Your Free National Park Owner's Guides

National Park Foundation Owners Guides

Thinking about your next national park experience? These FREE downloadable national park Owner's Guides are filled with travel tips and helpful information. It's your one-stop resource to discover all your national parks! Download today.

Support Your Parks

A collage of NPF merchandise, including a sweatshirt, a pillow, and a travel mug

This fall show off your
park pride with NPF gear.

A man reads a National Park Service informational sign at the side of a gravel trail at the foot of canyons in Capitol Reef National Park

Make a difference for America's treasured places – today and for years to come.

Who We Are Is What We Leave Behind

A close up of a green insulated water bottle being filled at a small spigot protruding from a wall

Last year, more than 8.5 million people visited Denali, Grand Teton, and Yosemite National Parks and contributed to nearly 8 million pounds of waste. Luckily, thanks to critical support from Subaru of America, through their annual Subaru Share the Love Event, these three parks have been at the forefront of efforts to increase sustainability and enhance environmental stewardship in our national parks. Through these endeavors, nearly half of that 8 million pounds of waste was recycled, composted, or otherwise not sent to landfills. An undeniable piece to this success is connecting with the millions of people that visit national parks annually as they plan their trips, while they are in parks and after, about waste challenges and what they can do to help. Learn more about our collaborative efforts to reduce waste in national parks, and learn what you can do to be a part of the solution!

Save the Date for the 2020 National
Christmas Tree Lighting

A nighttime view of the lit up National Christmas Tree, covered in small gold lights are a scattering of trios of larger star lights

Go ahead and get your calendars out! It’s time to save the date for the 98th National Christmas Tree Lighting. You’re invited to watch the lighting of the National Christmas Tree, which calls President’s Park home, on December 3 online at thenationaltree.org.


Due to public-health concerns, the National Park Service and National Park Foundation will not host a live audience for this year’s event, but the online show promises to bring lots of joy into your home. Sign up using the “Stay Updated” tab on the National Christmas Tree Lighting website for the latest news.

Cultural Landscape Apprenticeships at
San Antonio Missions

The Spanish Mission main structure with a domed center, a corner tower, and many large, arched openings in the limestone walls

We’re excited to share that NPF is funding four cultural landscape apprentice positions for local Hispanic and Latino young adults at San Antonio Missions National Historical Park in Texas. The apprenticeship program, in partnership with the National Park Service, Mission Heritage Partners, and American YouthWorks' Texas Conservation Corps, will provide job skills training under the direction of National Park Service mentors including grounds preservation, maintenance, and landscape bed rehabilitation.

Leave a Lasting Legacy

Monica Kramer hikes an incline on a dirt trail through the woods

“As a higher education administrator, knowledge is my life’s calling. The historic places that preserve the legacies of Martin Luther King, Harriet Tubman, and Booker T. Washington are important for all Americans to visit so that we can move forward as a nation.”


1916 Society member Monica Kramer has made a future gift to the national parks through her will so people will be able to connect with these important pieces of American history for generations to come. Read more about Monica’s story on our website and learn how you too can support the National Park Foundation through a legacy gift.

The Golden Age of Rail Travel

A vintage postcard, the left half is an aged picture of the red rock spires, the right half has a beige background with the words See America’s Scenic Sensation in a red script and just below it are the words Zion-Bryce Grand Canyon National Parks in a black, blocky font below

For many years, the only way for park lovers to get to newly created national parks in the west was by rail. People rushed to visit America’s national parks to experience the wonder and awe of what was then considered the vanishing frontier, and railroads began to transform our country’s landscape and culture. Take a trip back in time to the golden age of rail travel with our partners at Union Pacific to learn about how railroads and national parks partnered to create unique experiences for park enthusiasts in the early 20th century.

Plan Ahead for Winter Park Activities

A snowy scene of deer nibbling on vegetation sticking out of the snow-covered ground with snow dusted trees behind them

As temperatures begin to drop and you spot the first snowfall of the season in many areas of the country, it’s the perfect time to get planning your winter park escapes. From sledding to snowshoeing, stargazing and more, there are plenty of ways to make your visit to a national park memorable this winter season. Get ready and start planning your winter wonderland adventure today!

In Case You Missed It

A collage of three snapshots of the social media posts from the National Park Foundation’s various accounts set on a natural woodgrain background

Follow us on social media for more national park gems like these.

This Month's Quiz

A four story red brick duplex with cream shutters was once home to Edgar Allen Poe

Which national lakeshore takes its name from an Anishinaabek story about a bear and her two cubs swimming across Lake Michigan?

Congratulations to last month’s winner, Sandra Smith, from Burlington, KY who knew that Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site preserves the story of Edgar Allan Poe, author of “The Raven” and “The Tell-Tale Heart,” among others.


Way to go, Sandra!

Yellow, autumn-turned trees lining the Concord Riverbed, the North Bridge arches across the horizon, with the silhouette of two people standing at the center.

Wow! Where Is That?

Curious which park is featured at the top of this newsletter? Find out now!

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