Fellowship

Documenting, expanding, and complicating women’s stories at national parks and historic landmarks in the Pacific West through scholarship.

In partnership with the National Park Service, the National Park Foundation supports a fellowship for women’s history in the Pacific West with generous funding from private donors. Building on the 100th anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment, this fellowship’s focus on women in the Pacific West will deepen understanding of the region’s rich diversity through scholarship addressing gender, race, class, and the ongoing legacy of settler colonialism. The fellowship also supports efforts commemorating the 250th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence (America 250) by highlighting inclusive stories of women in the Pacific West, especially as they relate to evolving meanings of revolutionary ideals from 1776 to the present. 

Through a collaboration with a faculty mentor, Dr. Annelise Heinz, and student volunteers from the University of Oregon, the fellowship seeks to bring fresh academic scholarship to the field of public history. The fellow works with National Park Service staff to create interpretive and educational resources based on this scholarly research. Examples include visitor center exhibitions, resource guides, biographies of women, and innovative digital projects. The fellow is also collaborating with experts in their fields to offer online seminars to National Park Service staff and public talks for a national audience.


Women's History in the Pacific West Fellow

 

Nicole Martin at a farm

Nicole Martin

Dr. Nicole Martin earned her Ph.D. in History at Stanford University. As a social and cultural historian specializing in gender and women’s history, Reconstruction, and the American West, she is interested in how Americans have understood and reconciled questions of home and belonging in relation to territorial expansion. In support of America 250, she is developing a series of seminars, public talks, and online exhibits that relate the rich experiences of women and ideas of home in the Pacific West to the complicated story of unfinished revolutions throughout American history. 

More Than a Moment
The National Park Foundation has launched a new fund to support projects and programs that help the National Park Service share a more comprehensive American narrative that includes the voices of women whose vision, tenacity, and resilience moved them to climb mountains, take down barriers, protect the environment, and lead social movements.