Longfellow House - Washington's Headquarters National Historic Site

  • Beautiful flowers at the Longfellow House



Longfellow House Information

A historical garden, period furniture and artwork, and an archive make the Longfellow House near Boston a destination for visitors and researchers alike.

The house at 105 Brattle Street in Cambridge was witness to many significant events. It was here that George Washington took command of the Continental Army during the American Revolution. The first use in the United States of anesthesia for childbirth was administered to Fanny Longfellow at the house. Famous literary figures such as Charles Dickens and Nathaniel Hawthorne were visitors, as were politicians, actors, musicians, and others.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow filled the mansion with objects reflecting his interest in other cultures. European and Asian artwork, furniture, decorative objects and books are found throughout the house. The Longfellow house was truly a cosmopolitan home.

Making an Impact

Visiting Longfellow House

Map of the Park

Longfellow House - Washington's Headquarters National Historic Site
105 Brattle Street
Cambridge , MA

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