Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area

  • Lake Roosevelt



Lake Roosevelt Information

Observe the rich cultural and natural significance of Lake Roosevelt by boating, fishing, swimming, camping, or visiting historic Fort Spokane.

The Upper Columbia River is rich in cultural and natural significance. For more than 9000 years, people have gathered along the banks of the river to fish and trade with each other. Missionaries and explorers for the Hudson Bay Company and the Northwest Trading Company mapped the area and developed relationships with the tribes, which lived here. In 1941, damming of the Columbia River as part of the Columbia River Basin project created a 130-mile long lake.

Named for President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the lake is now the largest recreation feature in the Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area. Opportunities for boating, fishing, swimming, camping, canoeing and visiting historic Fort Spokane and St. Paul's Mission are highlights of visiting Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area.

Making an Impact

Visiting Lake Roosevelt

Lake Roosevelt
Lake Roosevelt

Map of the Park

Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area
1008 Crest Drive
Coulee Dam , WA

Parks Near Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area

Lake Chelan National
Discover one of the nation's deepest lakes, reaching a depth of 1,500 ft and offering boating, fishing, and lakeshore camping.
pine cones and pine tree branch
Ross Lake National Recreation Area is the most accessible part of the North Cascades National Park Service Complex, and offers camping and hiking.
North Cascades Mountains with flower fields
North Cascades National Park's alpine landscape includes jagged peaks, glaciers, waterways, and forested valleys. Visitors enjoy hiking and snow sports.
Whitman Mission National Historic site with covered wagon
Whitman Mission National Historic Site remembers Marcus and Narcissa Whitman who founded the Oregon Trail, a venture that added Oregon as a state.
From the Blog
Support Our Parks
The protection of our national parks is a job we can all do. Our parks need the support of people like you who love and visit them.