Hovenweep National Monument

  • Hovenweep pueblo village



Hovenweep Information

Hovenweep National Monument is home to six clusters of pueblo villages that expand across the Utah-Colorado border, where visitors can experience nature.

Hovenweep National Monument protects six prehistoric, Puebloan-era villages spread over a twenty-mile expanse of mesa tops and canyons along the Utah-Colorado border. Multi-storied towers perched on canyon rims and balanced on boulders lead visitors to marvel at the skill and motivation of their builders.Human habitation at Hovenweep dates to over 10,000 years ago when nomadic Paleoindians visited the Cajon Mesa to gather food and hunt game. These people used the area for centuries, following the seasonal weather patterns. By about A.D. 900, people started to settle at Hovenweep year-round, planting and harvesting crops in the rich soil of the mesa top.Hovenweep is noted for its solitude and undeveloped, natural character. The Square Tower Group is the primary contact facility with a visitor center, campground and interpretive trail.


Making an Impact

Visiting Hovenweep

Hovenweep park

Map of the Park

Hovenweep National Monument
McElmo Route
Cortez , CO

Parks Near Hovenweep National Monument

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View through a stone doorway of more stone doorways
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Natural Bridges National Monument
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