Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park

  • Hawaii volcanos



Hawai'i Volcanoes Information

The park in Hawai'i encompasses diverse environments that range from sea level to the summit of the earth's most massive volcano, Mauna Loa, at 13,677 feet.

Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park, established in 1916, displays the results of 70 million years of volcanism, migration, and evolution—processes that thrust a bare land from the sea and clothed it with complex and unique ecosystems and a distinct human culture. In addition to Mauna Loa, the park includes Kilauea, the world's most active volcano, which offers scientists insights on the birth of the Hawaiian Islands and visitors views of dramatic volcanic landscapes.

Over half of the park is designated wilderness and provides unusual hiking and camping opportunities. In recognition of its outstanding natural values, Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park was designated as an International Biosphere Reserve in 1980 and a World Heritage Site in 1987.

Making an Impact

Visiting Hawai'i Volcanoes

Hawaii volcano park
Hawaiian volcanic rock

Map of the Park

Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park
P.O. Box 52
Hawaii National Park , HI

Parks Near Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park

carved wooden spiritual totems
Hawaii's Pu'uhonua National Park formerly protected defeated warriors and civilians during battle. The park includes a complex of archaeological sites.
Beach view along the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail
A more conscious effort to protect Native Hawaiian cultural and natural resources has improved this gem of a historic trail.
Aquatic scenery at Kaloko Park
Visitors encounter a cultural and spiritual experience at Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park, where the spirit of the Kanaka Maoli people flows.
rock wall hill with blue sky
This national park in Hawaii shares the history of the early stages of the Hawaiian Kingdom. Visitors enjoy mountain trails and island birdwatching.
From the Blog

From the Blog

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