Fort Vancouver National Historic Site

  • Reenactors loading cannon at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site



Fort Vancouver Information

Fort Vancouver was the administrative headquarters and main supply depot for the Hudson's Bay Company's fur trading operations in the large Columbia Department.

Under the leadership of John McLoughlin, the fort became the center of political, cultural, and commercial activities in the Pacific Northwest. When American immigrants arrived in the Oregon Country during the 1830s and 1840s, Fort Vancouver provided them with essential supplies to begin their new settlements.

In 1996, the 366-acre Vancouver National Historic Reserve was established to protect adjacent, historically significant historical areas. It includes Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, as well as Vancouver Barracks, Officers' Row, Pearson Field, The Water Resources Education Center, and portions of the Columbia River waterfront.

Making an Impact

Visiting Fort Vancouver

Family filtering drity at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site
Tower and wall at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site

Map of the Park

Fort Vancouver National Historic Site
612 E Reserve Street
Vancouver , WA

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