Ebey's Landing National Historical Reserve

  • Seashore at Ebey's Landing National Historical Reserve



Ebey's Landing Information

Ebey's Landing provides a vivid historical record including the first exploration of Puget Sound by Captain George Vancouver in 1792.

Within the fast growing Puget Sound region, Ebey's Landing has quickly become the remaining area where a broad spectrum of Northwest history is still clearly visible in the landscape. The historical landscape of the reserve appears to today's visitors much as it did a century ago, when New England sea captains were drawn to Penn Cove. Historic farms are still farmed, forests harvested, and century-old buildings used as homes or places of business.

Ebey's Landing National Historical Reserve also shows early settlement by Colonel Isaac Ebey, an important figure in Washington Territory; growth and settlement resulting from the Oregon Trail and the Westward migration; the Donation Land Laws (1850-1855); and the continued growth and settlement of the town of Coupeville.

Making an Impact

Visiting Ebey's Landing

Map of the Park

Ebey's Landing National Historical Reserve
P.O. Box 774 162 Cemetery Road
Coupeville , WA

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From the Blog

From the Blog

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