Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area

  • Waterfall



Delaware Water Gap Information

Our famed 'Water Gap' is formed by Middle Delaware River's passage between low forested mountains and rocky mountain ridges.

Exiting the park, the river will run 200 miles more to Delaware Bay and the Atlantic Ocean at Wilmington, Delaware. Though set aside as an area for outdoor recreation, the land of this park is rich in history.

The park encompasses significant Native American archaeological sites, and several sites have been investigated. A number of structures also remain from early Dutch settlement and the colonial contact period. The entire region was a frontier of the French and Indian War. Historic rural villages from the 18th and 19th centuries remain intact on the New Jersey side, and landscapes of past settlements are scattered throughout the park.

In the 19th century, the village of Delaware Water Gap was a focus of the early resort industry fostered by the railroads. Even today the region is known for its vacation appeal.

Making an Impact

Visiting Delaware Water Gap

Mountain range with river

Map of the Park

Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area
River Road Off Route 209
Bushkill , PA

Parks Near Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area

View of the sprawling 	Delaware River
The Delaware River is one of the last large free-flowing rivers left in the contiguous 48 states.
Image of Wick House at Morristown National Park
Despite limited resources, Morristown served as quarters for the Continental Army on two occasions; the winter of 1777 and again during the Hard Winter of 1779.
Upper Delaware Scenic & Recreational River
Upper Delaware Scenic & Recreational River is among the top fishing rivers in the United States. Visitors enjoy scenic countryside views and recreation.
Railroad tracks at Steamtown National Historic Site
Steamtown National Historic Site in Scranton teaches the history of steam railroad transportation, and remembers the people who built the industrial railroad.
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