Cumberland Gap National Historical Park

  • Waterfall



Cumberland Gap Information

The story of the first doorway to the west is at Cumberland Gap National Historical Park, located where the borders of Tennessee, Kentucky, and Virginia meet.

Throughout the ages, poets, songwriters, novelists, journal writers, historians and artists have captured the grandeur of the Cumberland Gap. James Smith, in his journal of 1792, penned what is perhaps one of the most poignant descriptions of this national and historically significant landmark: "We started just as the sun began to gild the tops of the high mountains. We ascended Cumberland Mountain, from the top of which the bright luminary of day appeared to our view in all his rising glory; the mists dispersed and the floating clouds hasted away at his appearing. This is the famous Cumberland Gap..."

Carved by wind and water, Cumberland Gap forms a major break in the formidable Appalachian Mountain chain. First used by large game animals in their migratory journeys, followed by Native Americans, the Cumberland Gap was the first and best avenue for the settlement of the interior of this nation. From 1775 to 1810, the Gap's heyday, between 200,000 and 300,000 men, women, and children from all walks of life crossed the Gap into "Kentuckee."

Making an Impact

Visiting Cumberland Gap

Mountain range

Map of the Park

Cumberland Gap National Historical Park
P.O. Box 1848 US 25E South
Middlesboro , KY

Parks Near Cumberland Gap National Historical Park

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Peaceful view of the tree-lined river
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Andrea Johnson's brick house
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