Andersonville National Historic Site

  • Stockade wall at Andersonville

Anchors

About

Andersonville Information

Andersonville National Historic Site serves as a memorial to all American prisoners of war throughout the nation's history.

From the Revolutionary War to Operation Iraqi Freedom, American prisoners of war have endured untold hardships, and shown tremendous courage. The 515-acre park consists of the historic prison site and the National Cemetery. In 1998 the National Prisoner of War Museum opened at Andersonville, dedicated to the men and women of this country who have suffered captivity. Their story is one of sacrifice and courage.

Andersonville, or Camp Sumter as it was officially known, was one of the largest of many Confederate military prisons established during the Civil War. It was built early in 1864 after Confederate officials decided to move the large number of Federal prisoners kept in and around Richmond, Virginia, to a place of greater security and a more abundant food supply. During the 14 months the prison existed, more than 45,000 Union soldiers were confined here. Of these, almost 13,000 died from disease, poor sanitation, malnutrition, overcrowding, or exposure to the elements.

Making an Impact
Visiting

Visiting Andersonville

Map of the Park

Andersonville National Historic Site
496 Cemetery Road
Andersonville , GA

Parks Near Andersonville National Historic Site

Jimmy Carter's childhood home
President Carter's boyhood home captures the foundation of family and faith, which would be central to his commitment to public service.
Temple mound at Ocmulgee National Monument
Ocmulgee National Monument is a prehistoric Native American site, valuable during the Paleo-Indian period for its bounty of Ice Age mammals.
Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site
Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site is the training site of the first-ever African American military pilots, known as the Red Tails.
Tuskegee Institute
Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site, founded by Booker T. Washington, recruited the brightest teachers whose innovations made history.
From the Blog
Support Our Parks
The protection of our national parks is a job we can all do. Our parks need the support of people like you who love and visit them.