Support the National Park Foundation Through the Combined Federal Campaign

Tuesday, January 4, 2022NPF News
CELEBRATING ITS 60TH ANNIVERSARY, THE COMBINED FEDERAL CAMPAIGN PROVIDES FEDERAL EMPLOYEES AND RETIREES OPPORTUNITIES TO SUPPORT CAUSES THEY BELIEVE IN

WASHINGTON – The National Park Foundation (NPF) is proud to participate in the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC), which goes through January 15, 2022. Overseen by the Office of Personnel Management (OPM), the CFC is one of the largest fundraising campaigns in the world, providing federal employees and retirees the opportunity to support causes they believe in. People can donate to NPF through the CFC at GiveCFC.org using code #11252.

“Federal employees understand the value of public service and the importance of giving back to our country. National parks are one great place to do that,” said National Park Foundation President and CEO Will Shafroth. “If you love experiencing the wonder of national parks and all these places have to offer – whether exploring natural landscapes or our diverse history and heritage – consider giving back through the Combined Federal Campaign.”

The funds raised through CFC enable NPF to carry out its mission to protect national parks and connect people to them, including efforts like:

  • Protecting wildlife and natural resources
    At Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, NPF’s support is replenishing populations of Rio Grande cutthroat trout in the site's creeks and lakes. Funding from NPF will also aid the park in managing its elk population, monitoring amphibians and plants, and determining the health of various ecosystems.
  • Preserving history and culture
    NPF’s support is helping restore the homes where Dr. King was born and where he and Coretta Scott King raised their family and launched the civil rights movement. Part of Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historical Park, this project helps ensure that future visitors will get a first-hand glimpse of the lives and legacies of Dr. King and Coretta Scott King.
  • Connecting students of all ages to parks as classrooms
    NPF's Open OutDoors for Kids field trip program continues to evolve to meet the changing needs of students and teachers. NPF provides funding to help educators adapt to new distance learning expectations, so students can access parks as classrooms, whether it be an in-person, virtual, or hybrid visit.
  • Investing in the next generation of park stewards
    NPF provides financial support to service corps programs at national parks across the country. Service corps projects ranged from invasive species removal to historical preservation to trail restoration. These service corps programs also provide on-the-job training for members and inspire belonging, enabling people to build camaraderie, gain new skills, and learn about public lands careers.
  • Enhancing the visitor experience
    At Great Smoky Mountains National Park, NPF’s support helped create a new trail that provides access for visitors of all ability levels to one of Cades Cove's most popular historic homesites, the John Oliver Cabin. The half-mile, paved trail is approximately eight feet wide to provide adequate space for wheelchairs or other mobility devices to pass one another.
  • Establishing strong partnerships for the benefit of parks and local communities
    NPF's Strong Parks, Strong Communities initiative provides grants to build the capacity of philanthropic park partners, helping these groups undertake projects like redesigning their websites, developing new education or volunteer programs, and enhancing accessibility at their partner parks.

Learn more at GiveCFC.org. You can designate to NPF using the CFC designation number 11252 or EIN 52-1086761.


ABOUT THE NATIONAL PARK FOUNDATION
The National Park Foundation works to protect wildlife and park lands, preserve history and culture, educate and engage youth, and connect people everywhere to the wonder of parks. We do it in collaboration with the National Park Service, the park partner community, and with the generous support of donors, without whom our work would not be possible. Learn more at nationalparks.org.