Grand Teton National Park

Today In Grand Teton National Park

NPF'S Impact at Grand Teton National Park

  • Grand Teton National Park has partnered with the University of Pennsylvania to design and install green roofs on historically sod cabins and study the performance and success of the roofing system as a...

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    Don't Miss! Things To Do in Grand Teton National Park

    The areas around the Grand Teton mountain range and its lakes were established as a national park in 1929 in order to protect the land from commercial exploitation. The protected area was extended into the surrounding valley in 1950. Grand Teton National Park currently covers more than 310,000 acres and is located only 10 miles from Yellowstone National Park.

    Located high above sea level at elevations from elevations from 6,320 to 13,770 feet, Grand Teton National Park is a diverse ecosystem with terrain ranging from summertime wildflower meadows to rushing whitewater streams. There are also numerous serene lakes with deep blue pools, echoing the stillness and color of the glaciers that shaped them. The wild and winding Snake River descends through the park in a rush of water and the dense forests blanketing the mountainsides provide habitat for a vast array of fauna and flora, with some species dating back to the prehistoric era.

    Opportunities for viewing wildlife abound inside the park. It is often possible to see both grizzly and black bears, gray wolves, coyotes, bison and bald eagles. Other common sightings include pronghorns, elk and a variety of smaller mammals such as the Uinta ground squirrel. Speed limits within the park are reduced in many places, both for your safety and the safety of the animals as they cross park roadways, particularly in early morning and late evening.

     
     

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